Category Archives: Performers

Grab your maracas as Tenterfield Goes To Rio!

THE high country of the NSW New England region is renowned for its autumn colour, but one man who was born at Tenterfield is set to be remembered with an even brighter splash at the inaugural Peter Allen Festival this September.

Parkes celebrates Elvis, even though ‘The King’ never played that corner of NSW, and now Peter Allen fans are encouraged to find their way to Tenterfield to dress up in celebration of the town’s internationally famous son.

At the peak of Allen’s career his hit song ‘I Go To Rio’ topped the Australian charts for five weeks. This high-energy number was backed up by the flamboyant, maraca-shaking, Brazilian-shirted image that became synonymous with Peter Allen’s live performances.

Headlining Tenterfield’s three-day Peter Allen Festival is multi award-winning entertainer Danny Elliott, in a tribute show designed to get the feet tapping.

Danny has earned his Peter Allen stripes performing Tenterfield to Rio for a decade, and was awarded the Australian Entertainment Mo Award for Variety Entertainer of the Year.

“To be the headline act for the inaugural festival is an amazing honour,” he said. “I am so excited to perform the show in Tenterfield and to be a part of the celebration”.

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BOY’S BIOG The definitive biography of Peter Allen.

“Unlike the stage show The Boy From Oz — which is the story of Peter’s life — this show is me, celebrating the wonderful music of Peter Allen.”

The song list of any tribute act is always of great interest to fans, and a show built around the work of Australia’s Oscar-winning singer-songwriter raises the question of what Danny will be bringing to his cabaret-style performances.

“There’s so many! Where do you start?” he said. “‘I Go To Rio’ has those fun, great Latin rhythms. ‘Once Before I Go’ is a reflective song of life and love. ‘Bi-Coastal’ has a great story behind the story, but I love it for the great bass line.”

A perennial favourite of Peter Allen fans is the song he wrote as a gift to the town of his birth — ‘Tenterfield Saddler’ — regularly requested and performed by Allen’s friends Bette Midler and Olivia Newton-John.

“‘Tenterfield Saddler’ is just one of the best ever songs written,” Danny said.

“As an entertainer, performing Peter’s songs is incredible as every one has a great story.

“It’s my job to tell that story, which is what I love to do.”

Express yourself!

In honour of Tenterfield’s most famous son, the Peter Allen Festival plans to close the town’s main street to traffic and rename it Peter Allen Boulevard for the whole of Saturday September 8.

Throughout the day, the thoroughfare will be a celebration of music, art, culture and colour.

Visitors are encouraged to bring their best Peter Allen-themed looks to town and strut their stuff along the high street, which will host artisan markets, musicians and entertainment.

Danny Elliott will feature in three performances of Tenterfield to Rio at the Tenterfield School of Arts, situated right at the heart of Peter Allen Boulevard. The cabaret-style show has proved very popular with visitors, and due to popular demand there will be an extra show at 10am on Sunday September 9. 

“The energy and flamboyance of the shows are infectious,” Danny said. “But for me, it’s the connection Peter Allen made with people”.

“Whether in a giant stadium or an intimate cabaret, he connected with everyone in the room.

“I think Peter’s strength was to tell a story. What made him so popular was also the way these great stories were performed. With such high energy, even in ballads, he seemed to have an incredible electricity about him.”

Australian performers Todd McKenney and Hugh Jackman have stepped into Peter Allen’s shoes to perform The Boy From Oz in Australia and the United States, so what was it like for Danny to get to grips with the maracas?

“From an early age I played piano and sang, then went on to learn a variety of different musical instruments.” he said. “As a singer/musician, the two things I’ve had to work on to perform Tenterfield to Rio are the dance and movements, and the fitness to keep it up for a whole show!”

And why does he think people love dressing up? “I think it’s all about the escape. To get out of ‘normal life’ and have a bit of fun,” he said.

“To get out there and express yourself, and your likes, whether it’s a footy team or your favourite singer, it’s all fun!

“I’m already excited about it. Although I think it will be emotional when it comes to singing ‘Tenterfield Saddler’. To be right there, performing songs from Australia’s greatest singer/songwriter/entertainer Peter Allen, it already sends shivers up my spine. I can’t wait!”

The Peter Allen Festival September 7-9, 2018.

Peter Allen: the jazziest bush poet

WHEN he returned to Australia in 1971, Peter Allen would have been forgiven for wondering if his career in show business was over. But an unexpected piece of family history became the inspiration this boy from the bush needed to succeed on the world stage.

It had been a very long journey home for the ‘Boy From Oz’. Work offers were getting scarce for Peter Allen by the early 1970s. His mentor Judy Garland, who’d opened doors on both sides of the Atlantic for the young performer, was dead. His wife, Garland’s daughter Liza Minnelli, had asked for a divorce.

Allen had been performing for two decades and was at the age when many former child stars find themselves washed up.

His first self-titled album had bombed and gigs to promote it had been hosted by a Manhattan venue known as The Bitter End, which would have seemed terribly ironic to the man who’d been introduced to enormous audiences in the company of iconic musicians throughout the late 1960s.

BOY’S BIOG The definitive biography of Peter Allen.

According to Allen’s biographer, journalist Stephen Maclean (author of The Boy From Oz) it was an offer to perform in Australia that led Peter to “look his past in the eye”.

Ensconced at his mother Marion’s Bondi unit in that 1971 winter, Allen spent hours writing on the rooftop overlooking the ocean.

“One day, while Marion was out at work,” Maclean wrote, “Peter found himself fossicking about the flat. In the course of this he came upon an aged newspaper clipping from his near-forgotten birthplace of Tenterfield.”

The snippet recorded that Peter’s grandfather George Woolnough, whose High Street saddlery was already renowned, had a library at the University of New England named after him.

Memories came rushing at the 27-year-old performer. Key to his life experience to that point was the shooting suicide of his father and the grief that led to his immediate family’s gradual departure from the Australian bush. The fast-paced city had been Peter’s home since the mid 1960s, but his country roots held the seeds of an idea for this budding songwriter.

Emboldened by his modest start in New York, Peter Allen took this family history up to that Bondi rooftop and penned a new song.

‘Tenterfield Saddler’ was the result, a ballad that has bridged Australian bush poetry and international show-business ever since he recorded it in 1972.

‘Applause rolled on and on’

Mixing lyrical rhymes in a tale about long journeys down a country track replete with kangaroos and cockatoos, ‘Tenterfield Saddler’ is every inch a bush ballad in the tradition of Banjo Paterson.

It brings to the fore a lesser-known character in the cast of bush legends: the saddler, responsible for the safety and comfort of your ride, but also a storyteller.

Like all the best bush yarns, ‘Tenterfield Saddler’ has a dark side. In his grandson’s lyrics, the saddler holds the key to everyday life in a country town, but what the George Woolnough couldn’t give were the reasons his son had died at his own hand.

It is the suicide at the heart of ‘Tenterfield Saddler’ that gives it a place alongside one of Australia’s most enduring ballads ‘Waltzing Matilda’. In that song’s climax, the hero of the story, a swagman, drowns himself to avoid capture for sheep rustling.

When Allen recorded his song for the 1972 album of the same name, it made a small splash in the American music industry. But what this quirky ballad did, according to Stephen Maclean, was get Peter Allen noticed as a songwriter.

After a move to California in the early 1970s, despite having the barest of credentials, Peter Allen kept penning songs. He worked hard at his craft with other emerging writers and allowed his work to be recorded by artists on the brink of bigger singing careers.

In 1974, he eventually landed a hit when Olivia Newton-John released ‘I Honestly Love You’, co-written with Jeff Barry.

GOLDEN BOY Peter Allen (right) with co-writers Burt Bacharach, Carol Bayer Sager and Christopher Cross at the 1982 Oscar ceremony.

When he first performed the song live, long before Newton-John’s international number one single, Peter Allen recalled: “Everything stopped. Even the waiters didn’t move. The air was still and when I finished you could have heard a pin drop. Then they all began to applaud and the applause rolled on and on.”

Peter Allen went on to write with a range of collaborators, including Carol Bayer Sager. The two were part of the team that won the 1981 Academy Award for Best Original Song with ‘Arthur’s Theme’ from the soundtrack of the Dudley Moore film Arthur.

But Allen’s bush ballad ‘Tenterfield Saddler’ eventually took its place in the annals of songwriting. As Peter Allen’s fame saw him tour internationally, it became an audience favourite and graced the Australian charts multiple times. Bette Midler famously requested it every time she saw him perform.

And songs about travelling became a Peter Allen hallmark. By the time of his enduring 1980 ballad ‘I Still Call Australia Home’ the boy from the bush was embraced by a nation.

Tenterfield celebrates

A quiet country town took its place in popular culture when the song ‘Tenterfield Saddler’ hit the world stage. Now, this northern NSW destination is set to celebrate its Oscar-winning son at an annual festival, starting this September.

According to festival co-directors Josh Moylan and Matt Sing, the idea of celebrating the life and music of Peter Allen and the town of his birth has always been of interest to Tenterfield locals.

“There have previously been a couple of concerts and tributes to the great man, but never a festival dedicated to him,” Mr Moylan said.

“A couple of years ago during a community discussion, there was a push for a regional arts festival in Peter’s name as a gift to the iconic entertainer.”

The new event has taken approximately 18 months of collaboration between the Tenterfield Chamber of Tourism, Industry and Business, the Tenterfield Shire Council and the Tenterfield community, Moylan and Sing said.

The pair also report that support for the event is widespread. “The response and feedback from the locals has been fantastic!” Mr Moylan said.

“We already have a few motels booked out for the weekend, with many other rooms disappearing quickly! There are also many businesses and groups hard at work preparing for how they can add to the celebration.

“This is our inaugural festival, so we want visitors to be blown away by the events, activities and our unique town.”

A Peter Allen tribute concert will headline the event. ‘Tenterfield to Rio’ is written and performed by award-winning entertainer Danny Elliott.

“We are also hosting the ‘Tenterfield Jam Session’, a concert showcasing the amazing talent of Tenterfield musicians, celebrating all-Australian music,” Mr Moylan said.

On Saturday, September 8, the main strip of Tenterfield will be closed and re-named Peter Allen Boulevard for a street party with markets, food stalls, family activities and entertainment. There will also be many satellite events including breakfasts, dinners and tours.

“Visitors in 2018 will be able to join us for what will be the first year of a spectacular regional arts festival.

“They will get a taste of Tenterfield, our arts and music scene,” Mr Moylan said.

Incredible life story
PETER ALLEN PIANO
PIANO MAN Singer-songwriter Peter Allen was known for his high-energy live performances.

According to the festival co-directors, visitors will also gain insight into the town that impacted the life and music of one of Australia’s greatest performers, and sense what it was like for a young boy with grand ambitions in entertainment to walk the streets of a small country town.

In addition, one of the major aims of the Peter Allen Festival is to platform the work of new talent.

“A young local performer might realise that they too can have ambition to take on the whole world,” Mr Sing said.

Moylan and Sing are keen to underline that Peter Allen’s story encompassed both his major life achievements and his ability to overcome trying circumstances, something that was reflected in his songs.

“What persists throughout Peter’s struggles and successes is that happy, bubbly, energetic and kind demeanour,” Mr Sing said.

“His closest friends and people who knew him or worked with him describe his two traits that never changed: his incredible energy and enthusiasm; and his genuine, kind and loving personality.

“The greatest reason that Peter is known to us, both then and now, is his incredible ability to write great, meaningful and well-loved songs.

“Peter had great skills in encapsulating a story. Each line in his songs had meaning. He would write wonderfully complex and catchy melodies, and would weave the lyrics and melody together to create art.

“He would then deliver it onstage with all his energy and enthusiasm, which would move audiences all over the world,” Mr Sing said.

“To this day his songs remain icons. One of the great examples of this is ‘Tenterfield Saddler’, a song full of meaning that was a gift from Peter to the town where he shared so many childhood memories.”

The Peter Allen Festival is already planning events beyond 2018, with the aim of fostering existing local groups and industries.

“The 2019 festival will build on this year’s event, introducing workshops held all year in craft, music and entertainment, event organising, sound and lighting,” Mr Moylan said.

“A flagship festival is planned for 2020. We aim to bring a major headline act with a connection to Peter Allen to Tenterfield.”

The Peter Allen Festival September 7-9, 2018.

No country for older women

“The strategy behind the casting of younger women will take some explaining.”

IN February, Foxtel and Fremantle Media Australia announced the casting of an eagerly anticipated television adaptation of Picnic at Hanging Rock, Joan Lindsay’s 1967 Australian novel about a group of schoolgirls and their governess who go missing at a local rock formation on Valentine’s Day, 1900.

This fictional story was hauntingly filmed in 1975 by director Peter Weir, a production often credited with putting Australian movies back onto international screens after a decades-long hiatus.

CASTING COUP? Natalie Dormer, cast as Mrs Appleyard in the remake of Picnic at Hanging Rock.

I stumbled on the casting announcement late and immediately sought reactions in the media about one quirk in the production that is currently filming: there are no older actresses in the series.

But nobody seems to have commented that the producers are taking considerable licence with Joan Lindsay’s characters.

Cast as the widowed, expatriate English headmistress of the young ladies’ college that is central to the story, Natalie Dormer plays Mrs Appleyard, described by Lindsay as sporting a: “…high-piled greying pompadour”.

AGE APPROPRIATE Rachel Roberts as Mrs Appleyard in Peter Weir’s 1975 film Picnic at Hanging Rock.

The character was portrayed by British actor Rachel Roberts in Weir’s film, suitably coiffed and in her late forties at the time, whereas Dormer checks in at just 35.

Slightly more surreal is the casting of Australian actor Anna McGahan as mathematics mistress Greta McGraw, since McGahan is just 28, playing a character penned as having “coarse greying hair”.

Hair colour and texture would not specifically denote middle age had Lindsay not stated the teacher’s years at the time of the fateful picnic at 45. English-born Australian actor Vivean Gray took on the role for Peter Weir in her 50th year.

Australian actor Sibylla Budd has been cast in a role that was cut from the 1975 production, that of Miss Valange, mistress of art and literature.

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WHAT DO YOU KNOW? Helen Morse as Mlle de Poitiers and Vivean Gray as Miss McGraw in Peter Weir’s 1975 film Picnic at Hanging Rock.

At approximately forty years of age, Budd seems to be the matriarch of Appleyard College in Foxtel’s new vision of female hierarchy on Australia’s Colonial frontier.

Does age matter when it comes to schoolteachers in the final gasp of the Victorian era? Well, for this literary diehard, it certainly does, at least in the case of Miss McGraw.

Joan Lindsay put barely a stroke wrong in constructing her mystery, and specifically identifying McGraw’s age, leaving those of the other teachers as euphemistically middle-aged, or slightly older than the senior college students, was without doubt a deliberate plot point.

When editors took apart the original manuscript ahead of publication, lopping off the final chapter that explains the mystery, a crucial scene involving Miss McGraw was kept from readers. By identifying her age, and why she might have been more obsessed by the calculation of time than the other mistresses, Lindsay placed a clue that has rarely been noticed in half a century of analysis.

Even if the younger-than-written casting is designed to accommodate back-stories in the six 60-minute episodes, it is already working against the grain of the novel.

According to Foxtel’s head of drama Penny Win, the new adaptation: “… will take viewers on a new and in-depth journey into this incredibly iconic Australian story”.

LINDSAY
LADY LINDSAY Author Joan Lindsay (1896-1984).

Where the staff of Appleyard College are concerned, it’s apparent that vision is considerably younger than Peter Weir’s, and Joan Lindsay’s.

The original story also offers the opportunity for that rarest of beasts – the screenplay with multiple female roles, including a higher-than-usual number of women over the age of forty. For that reason alone the strategy behind the casting of younger women will take some explaining.

Imagining the impact of Hanging Rock passing across impossibly youthful faces – instead of those whose dignity has been achieved through the attainment of years – already disappoints this viewer.

The television series, due for release later in 2017, has not been without controversy. After an evocative protest, an Australian female director was hired in December 2016 to address a perceived imbalance in the recruitment of local screen talent of both genders.

To date, there’s been no commentary on what might well turn out to be ageism in the casting.

© Michael Burge, all rights reserved. Main image: ‘At the Hanging Rock’ by William Ford (1875), in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria.