Tag Archives: Glen Innes

Reflections of autumn in Glen Innes highlands

A JOINT exhibition of paintings and leadlight panels by two longstanding Glen Innes artists is set to open in March.

LIGHT & SHADOW ‘Morning Light Wattle Bend’ by Tanya Robertson-Cuninghame

Painter Tanya Robertson-Cuninghame and leadlighter Greville Wilton are creative icons of the New England region, and their new show ‘On Reflection’ is at The Makers Shed, Glen Innes, throughout autumn.

“The theme of this body of work is based on light, water and reflections,” Robertson-Cuninghame said. 

“It has culminated from my recent experience of environmental issues, which include drought and bushfires.

“I have chosen compositions that have a calming effect on me and hopefully also the viewer.”

According to Robertson-Cuninghame, this collection of her landscapes and seascapes is an attempt to convey a sense of solitude and tranquility in the natural environment, where the viewer has the desire to pause, look and ponder at the beauty of nature. 

“A view when one doesn’t have a view,” she said.

Robertson-Cuninghame has a strong connection to Glen Innes region reaching back to 1839 when her ancestors settled on “Wellington Vale”, Deepwater.

Born at Glen Innes, she attended Emmaville Central for primary before secondary and tertiary schooling in Sydney. She gained a Fine Arts Certificate at East Sydney Technical College in 1981, majoring in oil painting. 

LOCAL REFLECTIONS ‘Big Hole Severn River’ by Tanya Robertson-Cuninghame

Citing 16th century European and 19th and 20th century Australian Artists and practices, Robertson-Cuninghame’s creative process includes handmade canvas preparation and oil-paint making.

The works in ‘On Reflection’ include paintings featuring local waterways, including Pyes Creek and the Severn River, captured as the drought broke, restoring life-giving water to the region. 

Robertson-Cuninghame has also completed a series of seascapes on the Mid North Coast and Northern Rivers regions that illustrate the interplay of light and water in reflection.

Enduring collaboration

Over the past three decades, Robertson-Cuninghame has designed leadlight panels for Greville Wilton featuring in commissions and an exhibition of their work at Maitland Regional Art Gallery in 2013.

Wilton was born in rural New South Wales and moved to Sydney where he completed his education and began his working life in retail.

“Regular visits to family properties over this period consolidated my belief that city life was not for me,” he said. 

“I then travelled extensively through Europe and Asia where my appreciation of handmade crafts was ignited. 

CAPTIVE COLOUR ‘Green & Orange’ by Greville Wilton

“On my return to Australia I moved to Katoomba in the Blue Mountains and established a craft supply and gallery business.

“While in Katoomba, I tried my hand at several different crafts before attending a community college course in leadlighting and my life course was set.”

Wilton purchased land near Glen Innes on the Northern Tablelands four decades ago, describing it as a region of largely unspoiled nature, abundant wildlife and clearly-defined seasons.

“I moved my studio several times in Glen Innes before taking over the Butter Factory and creating a gallery and workshops that exhibited contemporary art and was a venue for many local and travelling musicians,” he said.

“My collaboration with Tanya Robertson-Cuninghame over the past thirty years is enduring.

“Our current show at The Makers Shed is a mix of panels designed by Tanya, and others influenced by the Art Deco movement, particularly Frank Lloyd Wright.

“The interaction of light with the colours and textures of glass is ever changing and a constant fascination.

“As we move into the 21st century I fear that many of the skills associated with traditional crafts will be lost, as technology overwhelms us and it becomes more difficult to earn an income through the arts. Computers can’t make leadlights… yet!” Wilton said.

On Reflection opens at The Makers Shed, 123 Grey Street Glen Innes on Saturday March 6 at 4pm, and runs until the end of May. A selection of works is available to view and buy online www.themakersshed.org

Meet the country writers boosting a festival’s word count

“It’s like living on a writer’s retreat and I love it.”

AUSTRALIA’S rural heartlands are renowned for cultivating works of literature, and in the northern NSW region of Glen Innes the second annual High Country Writers Festival is busy fostering wordsmiths ahead of its final sessions on Saturday October 24. It’s also getting help from plenty of country-born locals who are great with words.

International travel writer and blogger Amanda Woods has had her wings (slightly) clipped by the global COVID-19 pandemic, yet this New England born-and-bred journalist will be chatting at the High Country Writers Retreat with authors Mary Moody and Mary Garden (also renowned travel and adventure writers) about capturing the world on the page, especially at this time of ‘armchair travel’.

Glen Innes-based travel writer Amanda Woods

According to Amanda, being able to live and write in the country is “a gift”.

“The simple fact that I am woken up by the sounds of magpies rather than construction work, as I used to be in the city, allows me to start the day gently and slip into my writing with ease, rather than having to fight to centre myself and block out what’s happening around me.

“It’s like living on a writer’s retreat and I love it.”

A regular contributor to popular publication Escape, Amanda has also been published in Mindfood and Australian Traveller. She creates stories for her own site, Adventures All Around, and is currently working on a piece showcasing the New England region for The Telegraph UK.

“It’s such a great feeling to be a part of something special in my home town. I love the way the festival not only brings great authors to Glen Innes but also brings local people together to bond over books,” she said.

Call To Home

Deepwater-based writer Lucy Munro

Deepwater-based writer Lucy Munro will be chatting with Mary Moody about cool-climate kitchen gardening at The Makers Shed, and finds inspiration on her 45-minute commute into Glen Innes.

“Whole paragraphs sometimes appear to me somewhere along the New England Highway,” she said.

“The smallest and most uncomplicated day-to-day moments evoke so much creative feeling within me, and I regularly leave interactions with people with a fully-formed story in mind.

“I think this is because for the most part, country people – and country life too – is genuine and meaningful. What you see is what you get, and there is no greater stimulation for writing than that.”

Published in The Planthunter, Belle Magazine, and Smith Journal, Lucy is undertaking a Masters in Writing at the University of New England, and will have an essay ‘Call to Home’ included in Trisha Dixon’s new book Spirit of the Garden. She cites isolation and poor Wi-Fi as challenges for country writers.

“But time has taught me that these are elements that are precious and needed most for my writing. It also helps that I have an expanse of paddocks to wander and animals to ‘anthropomorphise’ when the disconnect is too much.”

“There is so much creative work happening in this region and around rural Australia. Writers festivals like this provide space for this community to connect and share ideas and stories. “

Author Walk

Inverell Shire-based writer D’Arcy Lloyd

Emerging author D’Arcy Lloyd is currently working on a series of short fiction works based on the story of Waterloo Station, home of the High Country Writers Retreat.  

Raised in the Inverell Shire and drawn back to it after four decades living in cities and coastal regions, she was inspired to revive her writing output as a result of the move.

“I started dabbling with fictional writing in the 1980s, but it wasn’t until I returned a few years ago that I realised the various book concepts and a number of draft short stories that had grown out of the sites, colours, sounds and smells of the New England.  

“Cosmopolitan inner-city living is thrilling and stimulating, and I miss it, but this region nourishes me, inescapably.  It’s like a vast emptiness pregnant with whatever we allow our dreams to make it.”

D’Arcy will be launching her website at the High Country Writers Retreat during an ‘author walk’ of Waterloo Station with co-owner Deborah Anderson, complete with heritage tales that are part of her new ‘Waterloo Series’ of micro fiction.

Box Seat

Deepwater-based author Michael Burge

The support of this team of local wordsmiths is wonderful. They’ll lead conversations with our visiting authors and get to the heart of some fabulous books and storytelling now available in this region. Every one of us grew up on a New England farm, or still farms today, and we all have a connection to this landscape and its ongoing stories.

My first novel (a coming-of-age crime story to be published by MidnightSun Publishing in 2021) is set in a mythical place, although the towns, locations, buildings, streetscapes and farmlands are unmistakably the uplands between Delungra and Bingara, the country I came from.

I’ll be joining Moree-based author Nicole Alexander for a chat about breathing life into historical fiction, which I’m probably looking forward to more than just about anyone else planning to attend the session!

Since moving to Deepwater in 2017 I’ve been working on two manuscripts set in the past, one of which revolves around the 19th century railway gatekeeper’s cottage I call home.

It’s a great privilege for me to be able to sit in the box seat and hear an acclaimed author like Nicole open the door on how she creates an historical novel.

The High Country Writers Festival & Retreat continues on Saturday October 24, 2020 in the Glen Innes Highlands.

 

 

The year of independent reading

Wonderful things happen when you open a bookshop. Ours started as a single set of shelves in one corner of the studio-gallery my husband and I created, The Makers Shed at Glen Innes in the NSW New England region. A year on, we’ve expanded, and we’re about to present our first literary award.

But it didn’t just happen by accident. Our resident High Country Book Club courageously joined us on a reading project with a purpose: to decide the best book in a year’s worth of independently-published reads.

When we started out, Richard and I found ourselves explaining a lot about indie books, but these days we barely mention that these titles have not been backed by a traditional publishing/marketing team. This is mainly because what readers want out of a book is the same thing no matter where it sprang from, and that’s a well-told story.

The club kicked off with a visit from London-based author Patsy Trench, who’d come to chat about her new non-fiction title A Country To Be Reckoned With.

This title is Patsy’s search for her great-great grandfather George Matcham Pitt, one of Australia’s earliest stock and station agents. The journey of discovery sheds an engaging new light on the European heritage of Australia.

We moved onto fiction for our next read. New Zealander Jenni Ogden’s acclaimed debut novel A Drop in the Ocean is set predominantly on an island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. It’s the story of an high-achieving American academic who hits rock bottom and decides to relocate to the other side of the world to work at a remote turtle sanctuary. It took me by surprise with its memorable castaways working out their lives on the edge of an ocean wilderness.

The ocean was a major theme of our next title, Nothing But Blue, by American author Diane Meyer Lowman.

The true story of her adventure while working on a German container ship as it sailed from New York to Australia and New Zealand in the late Seventies, this book bravely recreated the perspective of a 19-year-old thrust into several alien environments.

Nothing But Blue and A Drop in the Ocean were published by She Writes Press, one of the world’s biggest joint-venture publishing outfits assisting women to get their manuscripts published.

Australian author Kim Kelly paid us a visit in March to chat about her novel Lady Bird & The Fox and explained how creating the Indigenous protagonist of her book – Annie Bird – also encouraged her to courageously self-publish. After having her first few works published traditionally, Kim sensed her Gold Rush heroine might have languished while waiting for a publisher with enough courage in this #OwnVoices world.

The true story of a beloved dog who endured a spinal stroke was our next read. Nobody Told Me My Legs Don’t Work is a memoir with a difference by American writer Travis C. Yates.

A short but emotional ride, this publication sparked plenty of debate about animal rights and the ethics of domestic animal ownership.

Infants of the Brush by A. M. Watson is an historical fiction that recreates a real-life Eighteenth Century legal case and the gritty, challenging world of the boy chimney sweeps of London.

Amy kindly made us a video outlining the broad research she conducted which underpins the historical accuracy in her novel.

Euan Mitchell’s Feral Tracks brought us all back home with an Australian story about a teenager who leaves homes with a few dollars and some big issues to sort out on the road, as he hitchhikes across the country in search of purpose.

One of Australia’s most enduring self-published titles, this work was a confronting study of manhood in some tough Aussie environments.

English author William Blyghton provided plenty of contrast in his debut novel The House By The Marsh, which is also a study of manhood, but in a very different environment.

A story of grief late in life, this tale of human connection is set in several corners of evocative East Anglia, a county that we discovered was the birthplace of many novels, from works by Patricia Highsmith to Janet Frame.

We stayed in England for our read of Virginia Moffatt’s Echo Hall, a work of historical fiction set across multiple time periods in and around the same imposing home in another remote county of the United Kingdom.

With its ruminations on war and pacifism, Virginia’s intriguing, layered work explores the motivations of several families and their experiences of conflict, both domestic and between nations.

One of our country’s great marriage equality campaigners penned our next read, a very Australian read about human rights.

Shelley Argent’s memoir Just A Mum tells the story of her Brisbane upbringing and explores how this suburban wife and mother became an equality activist in the wake of one son’s coming out, and pushed this necessary social reform all the way to the gripping finale in Australia’s Parliament House.

We ended the year reading The Moor by English author Sam Haysom, a mystery story replete with characters facing enormous moral choices in and around a deceivingly simple wilderness walk.

Another intriguing debut novel, Sam’s book was created during 2015’s NaNoWriMo. (National Novel Writing Month), and published through Unbound. This crowdfunding publisher assists writers in bringing their ideas into life in book form, and is also the stable that Echo Hall sprang from.

All High Country Book Club titles are available for purchase from The Makers Shed, and can be posted to readers within Australia. Browse our online bookshop.

Congratulations to all the finalists in 2019… we’ve been thrilled, frightened, inspired, moved, angered, entertained and encouraged to keep reading by your engaging works of fiction and non-fiction.

Trophy handmade by Richard Moon.

The winner of the High Country Indie Book Award 2019 will be announced during the High Country Writers Festival on Saturday November 30, from 4 to 6pm at The Makers Shed, Glen Innes, NSW, Australia. All welcome!